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Non-appointed staff and faculty enrolment in UTORMFA

After a successful automatic enrolment process for appointed staff and faculty, Information Security, part of Information Technology Services is now prioritizing getting non-appointed staff and faculty enrolled in U of T’s multi-factor authentication service, UTORMFA. All non-appointed staff and faculty are now encouraged to self-enrol in UTORMFA to ensure further protection to your login. Those ...

Appointed faculty now enrolled in UTORMFA

June 15, 2022 marked the final day of the automatic UTORMFA enrollment process for the University of Toronto’s appointed faculty members, moving us one step closer to a more secure community. To date, 91 per cent of appointed faculty and 95 per cent of appointed staff have enrolled. UTORMFA is part of U of T’s ...

Information security news roundup: Ransomware on the rise in Canada

Cyber attacks have increased at an alarming rate with the current geo-political situation being a major contributing factor. The National Cyber Threat Assessment 2020 published by The Centre for Cyber Security suggested a potential increase across Canada in cyber crimes, ransomware and commercial espionage — particularly against businesses, academic institutions and governments to steal intellectual property ...

Cyber security in Canada: Time for a new approach

Isaac Straley, the University of Toronto’s (U of T) Chief Information Security Officer has called for a revamp of the national cyber security strategy in an op-ed published on May 11 in The Hill Times. The pandemic and the shift to remote work has added to the challenges faced in information security. Given the recent ...

Appointed faculty to be automatically enrolled in UTORMFA

All appointed faculty who have not already self-enrolled in the University of Toronto’s (U of T) multi-factor authentication (UTORMFA) will be automatically enrolled by June 15, 2022. Once enrolled, UTORMFA will be used to access all University systems. Last year, U of T introduced UTORMFA as part of its continuing effort to protect the U ...

Information security news roundup: Ransomware attacks, text message scams and cyber security training

In recent years, headlines about information security incidents have become increasingly common both nationally and internationally. Cyber criminals steal passwords, personal information and other sensitive data through various types of cyber attacks. Staying up to date with cyber security news and knowing how to stay safe online will help protect your personal information. Take a ...

Guidance to prevent Zoom bombing

The University of Toronto (U of T) community has reported an increase in Zoom bombing instances, where unwanted intruders take over and disrupt video-conference calls. We encourage all staff, faculty and students to adjust their settings and take precautions to avoid these situations. Here are some best practices you can incorporate when organizing and attending ...

Data privacy: A multi-faceted topic in higher education

To celebrate Data Privacy Day on Jan. 28, Information Technology Services (ITS) hosted a virtual panel event: Impact of evolving technology and privacy laws in higher education. The one-hour event opened a conversation about data privacy and protection and answered privacy questions from the University of Toronto (U of T) community. Over 145 attendees including ...

Safeguard your emails to help prevent privacy breaches

While email is one of the most efficient and prevalent forms of communication today, it brings with it the risk of privacy breaches when sharing sensitive data, such as personally identifiable information (PII) or personal health records. In a recent blog post, the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario (IPC) talks about how misdirected emails ...

Don’t fall for online job scams

Job offer scams are a form of phishing used to take advantage of students and new graduates who are seeking employment. Job offer scams typically work like this—you receive an unsolicited email that invites you to apply for or start a job with a high-paying salary. In most cases, the hacker asks for various forms ...